FINK vs SUPERSONIC ICEWORLD

WARNING: This post contains no images of Solomon!

When last we met, I'd realized my hiking plan might take a little longer than an hour and a half.

I had hiked diagonally towards that pond-like water and then along that stream-like thing on the right.

Turns out it was a lake and a raging glacial river.

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Here's a video check-in.

I searched everywhere for a way across that water, but turns out it's really quite cold. This whole enterprise was about getting on the other side and I was already too far along to go back and hike around the pond (lake).  I was enjoying the walk, so the slightly maybe possible spots where I could jump across with dangerous ramifications if I slipped, I ignored, thinking there would be plenty of spots to cross.

Let's take a moment to talk about rocks!

Though I've given my character Brink, in my soon-to-be-published-fingers-crossed-eco-epic-novel-series, Leopold & Brink, a PhD in Geology, I think rocks are cool and that's about all I know (more or less). This hike was not a great time to fall deeper in love with rocks, though it gave me a very mellow and pleasant pace.

I mention rocks for a reason (beyond plugging the aforementioned book).

From the distance, the ground looks like a bunch of tiny pebbles, but I assure you, boulders abounded. The alleged pebbles underneath the endless sea of large rocks went unnoticed.

There was never a good place to cross and eventually, I curved all the way back to the base of the boring glacier.

Here are those folks again from our study of SCALE in yesterday's post. They will return, comically. From here, I could tell they were training. I remember foolishly thinking, "Oh, should this be hard?"

And so, after a very long, though enjoyable, detour, I had to use the glacier's frozen surface (and that little plank of wood) as my river crossing.

Little did I know, glaciers are sensitive.

UP NEXT:

Meet the Glacier, or

THE ICE QUEEN WILL NOT TOLERATE BEING CALLED BORING!